SHARE
Dog Teeth
Dog Teeth
Download PDF

I think she actually likes it.

Here are some things I learned with my last dog, and why I am totally sticking with the toothbrushing with the new one:

First off, Im going to be honest: my last dog (Baxter) did not like to have his teeth brushed, at all, and eventually I just got tired of trying and started giving him treats that kept the tartar down a little bit. I do think it would have been preferable to regularly brush his teeth, but since I got him as a rescue and he didn’t love having his mouth touched, I figured I did the best I could with what I had.

When that dog passed away (at age 12), I was determined that, when we found another dog to join the family, I would make regularly tooth brushing/ mouth cleaning a habit from the very beginning. I am happy to say that I have been successful in this, and my new dog (age 11 months) has had her teeth brushed almost every day since we adopted her at 2 months old. This is a totally regular part of her life, and from the way she licks the toothpaste, I think she actually likes it.

Here are some things I learned with my last dog, and why I am totally sticking with the toothbrushing with the new one:

Lack of brushing can get painful for the dog and costly for you. Later in his life, Baxter developed a condition where his gums would grow down onto his teeth. Several times, we had to pay the vet to put him under anesthesia, where they would deep-clean the teeth and cut the gums back (ouch!). This was always at least a couple hundred dollars (once it was $500). I always, always felt terrible for him when it got to this point because I knew he was in pain. His teeth never got infected, but I do have a friend who has a dog with NO TEETH AT ALL because they kept getting infected and the vet eventually ended up pulling them all out. That was extremely costly (my friend wont tell me exactly how much, but she hinted at it going above $2,000).

Sonic cleaning is a decent option. We had this done a couple of times (it was $95), and it did work-his teeth were shiny and white, and the gum overgrowth slowed down. Results would have been a lot better if I had been able to brush the teeth on a regular basis.

Start young for best results. As I mentioned, the new puppy (her name is Lola) has zero problem with my brushing her teeth. Her breath is great, her teeth look good, and there is no blood on any toys when she chews them (this is a key indicator of tartar buildup).

The bottom line: dental care for dogs can get costly, so do what you can to get in the habit of regularly brushing your dogs teeth (or whatever other method you prefer to keep their mouth clean). Your dog will thank you, your bank account will thank you, and I will thank you.

Comments

comments